Oriole Feeders, 8-29-2020

When I sit in the porch and look North, I look out towards the clothesline.

On both ends of the pole I have jelly feeders.

Here’s a close-up of the simple feeders that hold the grape jelly.

I get dozens of orioles! As someone said, they’re on their way south for the winter.

24 thoughts on “Oriole Feeders, 8-29-2020

  1. Jo in Wyoming

    What a view! I
    We’ve had so much smoke, it’s hard to go outside. I do feel bad for those who have to work in it. The pictures of the firefighters without any masks..heartbreaking.

    We did get a little rain this week, (I finally got to the car wash!) so it helped wash the air, trees, grass, everything got a little bath. Today I can smell it again. So sad.
    Have a great weekend m everybody.

  2. Sue in Oregon

    I have Cardinal envy since we don’t have them in OR. I hope you can catch a couple on camera. Your grass is still so green. Ours is still brown except under the apple trees.

  3. Ellie

    Do you get yellow jacket or wasps at the grape jelly? I have some that fly around my hummingbird feeder but usually they’re not a problem. Did you make your feeder?

    1. CountryThreads Post author

      Darlynn – hmm, I don’t know how they stay away – maybe they eat there, too?

  4. Martha Engstler Gettysburg

    I’d love to try the jelly for the birds. Where did you get the holder or did you somehow make the feeder? Wonder if the ants come. They come to the table under the hummingbird feeder where a little sugar water drips.

    1. CountryThreads Post author

      Martha – I’ve seen these jelly feeders at Target and Walmart – cheap – under $10!

  5. Rhoda Ebersole

    This is to the woman a few days ago who lost 80 lb and gained 50 back with the Covid stress. I feel your pain. I lost 10 in Nevada and gained it all back in Wisconsin this summer. My biggest problem is I cannot get myself to walk more. At almost 76 I have no energy to get out and walk anymore. But lower temps today and lower humidity and the sun is shining and wind Is blowing maybe I can do it today.
    I have accomplished much sewing and small quilting projects however- mostly giveaways.

    1. CountryThreads Post author

      Rhoda E – it’s hard to make myself walk, too. This morning I took Hazel to town to walk – lots more fun!

  6. Launa Peters

    No Orioles up here, but Blue Jays, Hummingbirds and Wood Peckers. This morning our dog was asleep out on parking pad enjoying warmth of sunshine and a Doe n her Fawn were nearby. They know it is safe up here!

  7. Holly in Two Harbors

    I would love to see dozens of orioles–lucky you! We had a pair earlier in the year going to the hummingbird feeder, but they moved on. We’re too far north, I think.

    Those birds and critters outside can make a person feel so guilty if you fall down on the job of feeding them. I have a squirrel here with some kind of disability–I think he had a stroke. His head tips to one side and his right paw doesn’t work well and is usually curled up. Sometimes he spins around in circles to try to see, so there might be some sight loss there, too. He’s been coming to my feeders since mid-winter at, which time he had mange and hair loss so bad I don’t know how he didn’t freeze. I know–he sounds like a mess! I throw sunflower seeds on the ground for him and he comes looking for them when he sees me. I don’t think he would have made it through the winter if I hadn’t been feeding him. I can’t help but throw that seed out for him when he comes winding his wacky way toward me.

    1. CountryThreads Post author

      Holly in Two Harbors – you saved his life! And now you can’t stop feeding him because he depends on you! Hope he continues to thrive under your care.

  8. Ginny

    What a good idea for a jelly feeder!i Migration has started, we have hummingbirds all over
    I am going to put two more feeders up. I still get the Iowa bird list and they are reporting warblers, put some mealworms out.
    I am setting up my sewing room in the finished side of my shop. It is going to have lots of room

  9. Barbara Dillingham Moore

    Here in Tucson, we have a fair number of cardinals, Pyrrhuloxias (say para-loxia) also known as the Desert Cardinal, and Phainopeplas (say feno-pepla) a black bird with a crest. There are also Cactus Wren, Gambel’s Quail and doves, lots of mourning doves. The seasonal White Winged Dove (from the song of the same name) come up from Mexico during the time that the saguaro, say (sah-warro) bloom, as they eat the fruit, along with seeds from desert willow trees and ocotillo, (say oca-teeyo). We used to feed the quail and have hosted several clutches over the years. One year in particular stands out as we had a bumper crop of babies – that mama laid eggs twice that spring and we counted 24 babies and teens! When they grew older and came over the wall to the feeding block, it looked like a scene from “The Birds.” We had to stop feeding them because the predators also began to frequent our yard – hawks, coyotes, and bobcats. We have small dogs – Doxies – and don’t want them at risk. But I do love to see the baby quail in June, we call them walnuts because they’re so small and adorably cute.

      1. Barbara Dillingham Moore

        Glad I can help you learn a little bit about my geography! It’s a stark terrain but beautiful nonetheless. B

  10. Susan MM

    And it’s utterly mind boggling to me that the orioles migrate to Central and South America!

  11. Susan MM

    Several people have asked about ants getting into the grape jelly. Yes, they do, but I have seen many orioles sit and pick off a number of ants before eating the jelly. Their main food is insects, so it makes sense! Can you tell I love Orioles?!

  12. Gwen

    Great idea. I love looking at your farm. Your yard looks so peaceful. I spent many hours growing up hanging clothes on the clothes line. Good memories. The older I get, the more I miss my childhood home in Iowa.

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